Archive for August 2015

Be a Fit Rider by Addressing Rider Asymmetries: A Different and Game-Changing Perspective

Part of being a fit rider includes addressing rider asymmetries. The reality of the negative effects of rider asymmetries on the ‘horse-rider interaction’ are undeniable, especially when it comes to riding Dressage. Each riding discipline poses specific challenges to both horse and rider.  Dressage, in particular, requires not only unusually keen body awareness, but also read more…

What is Equine Yoga?

Equine Yoga involves teaching the Rider specific Yoga postures, or Asanas, that have been identified as being beneficial for creating a smoother, more accurate, balanced and connected riding experience for both the Rider and their Equine companion. It is based on classical Yoga principles and practices that have been in existence for over 5000 years read more…

A Fluke Accident Changed My Opinion on Wearing a Helmet

I understand the rationale behind the decision to not wear a helmet: I’m a good rider; this horse doesn’t do anything naughty; I know there’s a possibility a fluke may happen, but the chances are one in a million. I understand. I was a good rider; I was in the Olympics. My horse had never read more…

Improving “One-Sidedness” with the Balimo Chair

FEI dressage rider and trainer Vicky Busch was selected to be a demo rider both in the 2009 USDF symposium with Jan Brink in Austin, TX, and the 2015 HDS Conrad Schumacher symposium in Cypress, TX.  A bit of envy easily creeps in when we watch demo riders at clinics and symposiums– they are usually read more…

Like Rider, Like Horse

I consider myself a fairly fit person.  I exercise on a regular basis; I cross train with sessions of cardio, strength training, and stretching.  I do Pilates.  I ride multiple horses a day.  I take care of ten horses, feeding, cleaning stalls, maintenance work.   Yet, after a particularly strenuous work-out, or when I explore a read more…

Could some rider asymmetries be caused by habitual movements during riding?

One of the most fundamental parts of the training scale of horses is straightness… And why do we want straightness? With straightness comes the ability to perform equally well on both leads. In other words: it is just as easy for our horse to take the right as the left lead canter, to perform a read more…